Friday, December 2, 2022
News

Brain MRI can help in predicting chances of Alzheimer's disease in future

   SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend    Print this Page   COMMENT

Washington | June 30, 2022 9:25:40 PM IST
Researchers are studying how a combination of genetics and brain MRIs may be used to predict the chances of developing Alzheimer's disease in the future.

In a newly published study, researchers from SFU's Functional and Anatomical Imaging & Shape Analysis Lab (FAISAL) identified distinct properties of brain MRIs and genetics that impact the prediction of Dementia of Alzheimer's Type, or DAT, for patients at various stages of the disease, then developed a biomarker that can help predict future conversion to DAT.

"Our findings reveal that while genetic features have lower predictive power than MRI features, combining both modalities can improve the performance in predicting the future conversion to DAT," says study lead author Ghazal Mirabnahrazam, a research assistant currently completing a master's degree in engineering science at SFU.

Dementia scores based on genetic data were shown to better predict future DAT progression in currently normal patients who will develop DAT at a later time, while MRI data, which reflects anatomical changes in the brain, was shown to better predict future DAT in those with mild cognitive impairment.

"In a clinical setting, clinicians can use our model to predict a quantitative score indicating the similarity between a subject's observed patterns based on MRI and genetic data at the time of clinical visit and DAT patterns," says senior author Mirza Faisal Beg, a professor in SFU's School of Engineering Science.

"This is extremely useful, specifically at the MCI (mild cognitively impaired) stage in identifying those who will progress to DAT in the future. Being able to accurately estimate the chance of future conversion to DAT using only baseline information is extremely valuable because it provides practitioners with deep insight and enough time to plan appropriate care for each patient based on their probability of developing Alzheimer's disease.

"Furthermore, it can provide potentially critical information for drug trials and the development of preventative measures," adds Beg. "This information can aid in the selection of the appropriate cohort of patients for clinical trials, which can lead to a more promising outcome." (ANI)

 
  LATEST COMMENTS ()
POST YOUR COMMENT
Comments Not Available
 
POST YOUR COMMENT
 
 
TRENDING TOPICS
 
 
CITY NEWS
MORE CITIES
 
 
 
MORE HEALTH NEWS
New genetic mutation behind childhood gl...
Research reveals how ketamine acts as 's...
Nanotech strategy shows promise to treat...
World's first intra-nasal vaccine for CO...
Two transgender doctors in Telangana get...
Four OPDs shifted to new GMCH campus in ...
More...
 
INDIA WORLD ASIA
10-day Hornbill Festival kick starts in ...
7 hurt as two students' groups clash in ...
Fire in cars, bikes parked outside Delhi...
5 jawans injured in encounter with Naxal...
Priests involved in Vizhinjam violence: ...
Nature still under-financed, says UN rep...
More...    
 
 Top Stories
Our mistakes cost us the game again... 
Mitchell Marsh to undergo ankle sur... 
I respect what he has been through:... 
Akhilesh Yadav will not become CM, ... 
International Art Exhibition: Kangr... 
Inside Hansika Motwani's mehendi ce... 
Tata AIA Life Certified as a Great ... 
ISL: Odisha FC aim to continue surg...