Saturday, October 8, 2022
News

Study suggests voter fraud conspiracy theories can backfire on those propagating them

   SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend    Print this Page   COMMENT

Washington | August 17, 2022 11:29:36 PM IST
A recent study has uncovered small but discernible links between social media engagement with misinformation about the 2020 US presidential election and voter behaviour in the 2021 Georgia Senate runoff election.

The findings of the study have been published in the journal 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences' (PNAS).

Following the 2020 US presidential election and President Joseph R. Biden's close victory in Georgia, misinformation and claims of election fraud were promoted.

In order to test whether such claims affected subsequent trust in elections and voting behaviour, Jon Green and colleagues examined the social media activity and voting behaviour of 45,431 Twitter users who matched Georgia voter registration records.

The authors evaluated whether the Twitter users' 'likes' and retweets suggested that they endorsed or detracted from election fraud theories. Next, they noted whether or not the users voted in the 2020 presidential election and the 2021 Georgia Senate runoff election.

Links between social media activity and voting behaviour were small but detectable. Publicly opposing election fraud conspiracy theories was associated with slightly higher voter turnout in 2021 than in 2020, whereas promoting such theories was associated with slightly lower turnout in 2021 than in 2020.

Engagement with election conspiracy theories carried small, but detectable, associations with the turnout: positive among those opposing such claims and negative among promoters.

These observational findings among social media users document the 2020 election-theft claims' correspondence with real-world, offline behaviour. Those promoting conspiracy theories questioning the legitimacy of the US electoral process were, at the same time, somewhat less likely than defenders to participate in it.

According to the authors, the results suggest that conspiracy theories aimed at undermining faith in elections may influence voter behavior. (ANI)

 
  LATEST COMMENTS ()
POST YOUR COMMENT
Comments Not Available
 
POST YOUR COMMENT
 
 
TRENDING TOPICS
 
 
CITY NEWS
MORE CITIES
 
 
 
MORE SCIENCE NEWS
Twitter nudges users to share, copy link...
Research finds reason behind some countr...
Researchers find how Chromatin topology ...
Researchers find domestication history o...
Dinosaur-killing asteroid triggered 'meg...
How dormant bacteria calculate their ret...
More...
 
INDIA WORLD ASIA
Two MP Cong MLAs booked for harassing wo...
Garbage piles in Chandigarh raise health...
Uddhav's response sought to Shinde group...
Gautam Adani announces investments worth...
ED attaches Rs 1.54 cr of Indians for Am...
Study of 1.6mn patients find very low in...
More...    
 
 Top Stories
U19 WC Division 2-Asia Qualifier: S... 
Indian students to benefit the most... 
International bridge championship r... 
Man practising witchcraft sacrifice... 
Eva Mendes clarifies she never quit... 
Odisha Govt approves Annual Work Pl... 
Pakistan Government to use 'full fo... 
Another wild elephant found dead in...