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Study suggests Amazon forests failing to keep up with climate change

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Washington D.C. [USA] | November 8, 2018 3:11:29 PM IST
Amazon forests are failing to keep up with climate change.

According to the research, effects of climate change are altering the rainforest's composition of tree species but not quickly enough to keep up with the changing environment.

The team of analysts used long-term records from more than a hundred plots as part of the Amazon Forest Inventory Network (RAINFOR) to track the lives of individual trees across the Amazon region. Their results found that since the 1980s, the effects of global environmental change - stronger droughts, increased temperatures and higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere - have slowly impacted specific tree species' growth and mortality.

In particular, the study found the most moisture-loving tree species are dying more frequently than other species and those suited to drier climates were unable to replace them.

"The ecosystem's response is lagging behind the rate of climate change. The data showed us that the droughts that hit the Amazon basin in the last decades had serious consequences for the make-up of the forest, with higher mortality in tree species most vulnerable to droughts and not enough compensatory growth in species better equipped to survive drier conditions," said Dr Adriane Esquivel Muelbert, lead author of the study.

The team also found that bigger trees - predominantly canopy species in the upper levels of the forests - are outcompeting smaller plants. The team's observations confirm the belief that canopy species would be climate change "winners" as they benefit from increased carbon dioxide, which can allow them to grow more quickly.

This further suggests that higher carbon dioxide concentrations also have a direct impact on rainforest composition and forest dynamics - the way forests grow, die and change.

In addition, the study shows that pioneer trees, trees that quickly spring up and grow in gaps left behind when trees die, are benefiting from the acceleration of forest dynamics.

The increase in some pioneer trees, such as the extremely fast growing Cecropia, is consistent with the observed changes in forest dynamics, which may also ultimately be driven by increased carbon dioxide levels," said Oliver Phillips, co-author of the study.

Dr Kyle Dexter, one of the lead researchers said, "Our findings highlight the need for strict measures to protect existing intact rainforests. Deforestation for agriculture and livestock is known to intensify the droughts in this region, which is exacerbating the effects already being caused by global climate change." (ANI)

 
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