Saturday, December 15, 2018
News

Giant prehistoric shark teeth found in Australia

   SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend    Print this Page   COMMENT

Canberra | Thursday, 2018 10:45:04 AM IST
A group of Australian researchers discovered a set of teeth that belonged to a giant prehistoric shark from about 25 million years ago, authorities announced on Thursday.

The fossilised teeth of the extinct mega-toothed shark Carcharocles angustidens, which could grow up to 9 metres long, were found by paleontologists from Museums Victoria and a local scientist in the coastal town of Jan Juc, about 100 km southwest of Melbourne, reports Efe news.

There were also teeth of Sixgill sharks (Hexanchus), which suggests that the latter fed on the remains of the huge creature after its death, according to a statement from Museums Victoria.

Sharks lose one tooth per day but they have the ability to regenerate their teeth.

In addition, the cartilage - the material a shark skeleton is made of - does not easily fossilise.

"These teeth are of international significance, as they represent one of just three associated groupings of Carcharocles angustidens teeth in the world, and the very first set to ever be discovered in Australia," Eric Fitzgerald, paleontologist at Victoria Museums, explained.

Remains of the "Carcharocles angustidens", which is twice as big as great white sharks, were first sighted by Philip Mullaly, a science enthusiast who was searching for fossils on the beach.

During his walk along the beach in Jan Juc, known to be one of Australia's most important fossil sites, Mullaly spotted a "shining glint in a boulder and saw a quarter of the (fossilised) tooth exposed",

Later on, Fitzgerald and his team conducted other excavations at the site and managed to collect another 40 teeth.

Most of them belonged to the Carcharocles angustidens and others to a smaller species called Sixgill shark, an animal that still inhabits the coasts of Victoria state.

The teeth of Sixgills may have become dislodged from their jaws as they fed on the carcass of the Carcharocles angustidens after it died.

The Sixgill nowadays feed on the remains of whales and other animals, a lifestyle they seem to have maintained for millions of years.

--IANS ksk

( 346 Words)

2018-08-09-10:10:06 (IANS)

 
  LATEST COMMENTS (0)
POST YOUR COMMENT
Comments Not Available
 
POST YOUR COMMENT
 
 
TRENDING TOPICS
 
 
CITY NEWS
MORE CITIES
 
 
 
MORE SCIENCE NEWS
Australia to provide support for Europea...
NASA seeks US partners to develop reusab...
NASA photographs Mars InSight lander fro...
Neanderthal genes behind shape of human ...
NASA's Juno mission to cross halfway to ...
ALMA finds protoplanetary disks depictin...
More...
 
INDIA WORLD ASIA
V Senthil Balaji could've better joined ...
Rafale deal: French Minister refuses to...
Palaniswami seeks PM Modi's intervention...
MMRDA terminates LTSE's Monorail contrac...
PM Modi to inaugurate Raebareli-Fatehpur...
Nepal: 18 dead, 16 injured after mini-tr...
More...    
 
 Top Stories
Narendra Dabholkar Case: Court gran... 
Govt extends tenures of IB, RAW chi... 
US-China comprehensive trade deal '... 
New MP Assembly has 187 'crorepati'... 
Meerut: After Bulandshahr clashes, ... 
HC quashes Centre's ban on oxytocin... 
Centre misleading Supreme Court on ... 
Congress, Left follow models of cor...