Tuesday, November 29, 2022
News

Researchers discover new cancer treatments in 'dark matter' of human genome

   SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend    Print this Page   COMMENT

Washington | October 7, 2022 1:28:42 PM IST
Researchers have developed a screening method to discover new drug targets for cancer treatment in the so-called 'Dark Matter' of the genome. They applied their method to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the greatest cancer killer for which effective therapies are urgently sought. They could show that inhibiting identified targets could greatly slow down cancer growth, and their method is adaptable to other cancers.

For new targets, they looked at the poorly-understood class of genes called "long noncoding RNAs (Ribonucleic acids)" (lncRNAs). LncRNAs exist in abundance in the so-called "Dark Matter" or non-protein-coding DNA that constitutes the vast majority of our genome. The human genome contains around 20,000 "classical" protein-coding genes, but this number is dwarfed by 100,000 lncRNAs. Of 99% of lncRNAs the biological functions are unknown.

As the name long noncoding RNAs implies, unlike messenger RNAs (mRNAs), they do not encode the construction plans for proteins. Like for mRNAs, the building instructions for lncRNAs are contained in the cell's DNA.

To study the role of lncRNAs in NSCLC, the researchers started by analyzing publicly available datasets to see which lncRNAs are present in NSCLC. This analysis led to a list of over 800 lnRNAs, whose importance for NSCLC cells the researchers wished to investigate. For this investigation, they developed a screening system which prevents the production of the selected lncRNAs by deleting part of their construction instructions in the DNA.

They applied their screening system to two NSCLC cell lines derived from patients, and looked how the inhibition of the selected lncRNAs affected so called "hallmarks" of cancer cells. Hallmarks are cellular behaviors that contribute to disease progression: Proliferation, metastasis formation and therapy resistance. "The advantage of assessing three different cancer hallmarks is that we have a comprehensive view but also have substantial amounts of data from different experiments, from which we needed to derive a single list of long noncoding RNAS that are important for non-small cell lung cancer," says Rory Johnson, Assistant Professor at the University of Bern, who led the NCCR RNA & Disease funded project. The analysis yielded in the end a list of 80 high-confidence candidate lncRNAs important for NSCLC out of the over 800 investigated. From these 80, the researchers picked out several lncRNAs for follow up experiments.

For these follow up experiments an approach was used, which does not work at the DNA level but targets lncRNAs after their production. For this purpose, the researchers used small chemically-synthesized RNAs called Antisense Oligonucleotides (ASOs), which bind to the lncRNAs they target and lead to their degradation. Of note, several ASOs are approved for treating human diseases, although none yet for cancer.

These follow up experiments showed that, for the majority of the picked lnRNAs, their destruction by an ASO inhibited cancer cell division in cell culture. Importantly, the same treatment produced little if any effect on non-cancerous lung cells, which should not be harmed by the cancer treatment. In a 3-dimensional model of NSCLC, which more closely resembles the tumor than cell culture, the inhibition of a single lncRNA with an ASO reduced the tumor growth by more than half. "We were positively surprised to see how well the antisense oligonucleotides could restrain tumor growth in different models," states Taisia Polidori, co-first author, who worked on the project as part of her doctoral thesis research at the University of Bern.

The researchers are continuing their research in pre-clinical cancer models and are considering collaborating with existing companies or creating a startup in order to develop a drug to treat patients. Regarding other cancers, Roberta Esposito, co-first author and postdoc at the University of Bern: "Like a telescope that can be quite easily repositioned to study a different part of space, our approach should be easily adaptable to reveal new potential treatment types for other cancer types." Dr. Esposito will now apply the "telescope" to identify new targets for colorectal cancer. For this purpose, she has received funding by the Medical Faculty of the University of Bern donated by the Beactrice Ederer-Weber foundation. (ANI)

 
  LATEST COMMENTS (0)
POST YOUR COMMENT
Comments Not Available
 
POST YOUR COMMENT
 
 
TRENDING TOPICS
 
 
CITY NEWS
MORE CITIES
 
 
 
MORE HEALTH NEWS
Gut microbes disturbed by COVID-19 infec...
Women's Health: Breakthrough in bacteria...
No ransom demand brought to notice by AI...
SC issues notice to Centre, states on pl...
New study sheds light on growth of human...
World's 1st Intranasal Covid vax from Bh...
More...
 
INDIA WORLD ASIA
Sitharaman urged to introduce policies t...
Mehrauli Murder: Men with swords attack ...
Govt will promote IT and electronics ind...
Cash for ticket case: Delhi Court grants...
Complaints lodged in Raj for projecting ...
'Maha Governor planning to quit is only ...
More...    
 
 Top Stories
I-League: RoundGlass Punjab earn fu... 
Centre asks SC Collegium to reconsi... 
Strong headwinds to slowdown global... 
Sustainability is a critical differ... 
Kanye West's rapper friend Pusha T ... 
Assam Police arrests two dacoits in... 
Protests against zero-covid policy ... 
Delhi Police records statement of S...