Wednesday, September 30, 2020
News

Diet, nutrition effects gut microbiome

   SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend    Print this Page   COMMENT

Washington D.C. | March 26, 2020 9:11:27 AM IST
Nutrition and diet have a great impact on microbial composition in the gut. This in in turn affects a range of metabolic, hormonal, and neurological processes, according to a literature review by scientists from the George Washington University (GW) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

The article was published in Nutrition Reviews.

Until recently, the human microbiome remained an understudied target for new strategies to diagnose and treat disease. The prevalence of diseases that may involve disruption of the gut microbiome are increasing and there is currently no consensus in the scientific community on what defines a healthy gut microbiome.

The review systematically assessed the current understanding of the interactions between nutrition and the gut microbiome in healthy adults.

"As we learn more about the gut microbiome and nutrition, we are learning how influential they are to each other and, perhaps more central to public health, the role they both play in prevention and treatment of disease," said Leigh A. Frame, PhD, MHS, program director of the Integrative Medicine Programs at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

The authors found that the bi-directional relationship between nutrition and the gut microbiome is emerging as more research is conducted on how microbiota utilize and produce both macro and micronutrients. Research has focused on the benefits of dietary fiber, which serves as fuel for gut microbiota, and also found that, in contrast, protein promotes microbial protein metabolism and potentially harmful byproducts that may sit in the gut, increasing the risk of negative health outcomes.

"This review reveals that the measurement tools currently in our arsenal are ineffective for identifying the microbial and molecular signatures that can serve as robust indicators of health and disease," said Scott Jackson, adjunct assistant professor of clinical research and leadership at SMHS and leader of the Complex Microbial Systems Group at NIST.

The authors suggested that future research must consider individual responses to diet and how the gut microbiome responds to dietary interventions, as well as emphasized function of the microbiome over merely composition. (ANI)

 
  LATEST COMMENTS ()
POST YOUR COMMENT
Comments Not Available
 
POST YOUR COMMENT
 
 
TRENDING TOPICS
 
 
CITY NEWS
MORE CITIES
 
 
 
MORE HEALTH NEWS
TN extends Covid-19 lockdown till Octobe...
Extracurricular sport in childhood more ...
Yediyurappa's Political Secy tests Covid...
As cases spike, parties in Kerala agree ...
K'taka to see strict social distancing n...
India does not give a 'straight count' o...
More...
 
INDIA WORLD ASIA
Andhra Pradesh govt hatching conspiracy ...
221 more COVID-19 cases reported in Arun...
J&K Police file chargesheet against 4 La...
Deputy Collector held for torturing wife...
Congress calls party's Bihar unit, CLP l...
AIIMS say no trace of poison in Sushant'...
More...    
 
 Top Stories
IPL: DC's Shreyas Iyer fined for sl... 
Reduce food loss or risk drop in fo... 
Rajnath Singh welcomes verdict in B... 
Families of 12 detained Hong Konger... 
Pompeo to Travel to Japan, S. Korea... 
Yo Yo Honey Singh: There has been a... 
Special judge said Babri Masjid dem... 
Court's decision proves no conspira...