Monday, September 28, 2020
News

Kids in low income countries prescribed excess antibiotics

   SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend    Print this Page   COMMENT

New York | Saturday, 2019 8:15:05 PM IST
Kids in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) are receiving an excessive amount of antibiotic prescriptions that could harm the children's ability to fight pathogens as well as increase antibiotic resistance worldwide, warns a new study.

Children in these countries received 25 antibiotic prescriptions through age five - a "remarkable" estimate, given that two antibiotic prescriptions per year is considered excessive in many high-income settings, said the study published in the journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

"We knew children in LMICs are sick more often, and we knew antibiotic prescription rates are high in many countries. What we did not know was how these elements translate into actual antibiotic exposure - and the results are rather alarming," said lead author of the study Gunther Fink from Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH), Basel, Switzerland.

Antimicrobial resistance is one of today's biggest threats to global health and development, according to the World Health Organization.

One factor contributing to this global health threat is the excessive use of antibiotics worldwide.

The research team from Swiss TPH and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in the US analysed data from 2007-2017 from health facilities and household surveys from eight countries: Haiti, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Nepal, Senegal, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Results showed that antibiotics were administered in 81 per cent of cases for children with a respiratory illness, in 50 per cent for children with diarrhoea, and in 28 per cent for children with malaria.

The researchers found that the number of antibiotic prescriptions in early childhood varied from country to country.

While a child in Senegal received approximately one antibiotic prescription per year in the first five years of life, a child in Uganda was prescribed up to 12.

In comparison, a prior study showed that children under five in Europe receive less than one antibiotic prescription per year on average.

"This number is still high given that the vast majority of infections in this age group are of viral origin," said study co-author Valerie D'Acremont from Swiss TPH.

--IANS gb/rt

( 350 Words)

2019-12-14-14:14:05 (IANS)

 
  LATEST COMMENTS ()
POST YOUR COMMENT
Comments Not Available
 
POST YOUR COMMENT
 
 
TRENDING TOPICS
 
 
CITY NEWS
MORE CITIES
 
 
 
MORE HEALTH NEWS
Do you have enough isolation wards, Delh...
Goa DGP tests corona positive...
Chatbot-based AI health apps can't be yo...
How hormone therapy slows progression of...
World Heart Day: Yoga to keep your heart...
Cannabis use for menopause symptom manag...
More...
 
INDIA WORLD ASIA
Karnataka braces for shutdown on Monday ...
Punjab CM launches stir against farm law...
J-K govt to amend rules for ease in issu...
Vaishno Devi: Book puja online, get pras...
SC refuses to entertain plea against TRA...
Youth injured at Anantnag encounter site...
More...    
 
 Top Stories
SBI waives processing fee on select... 
ICRA revises forecast, pegs India's... 
Lata Mangeshkar turns 91: B-Town wi... 
Moon condoles death of S.Korean off... 
Gangster killed as UP police vehicl... 
MP officer shunted for thrashing wi... 
Football Delhi to launch virtual sk... 
Airtel narrowing gap with Jio on 4G...