Wednesday, August 21, 2019
News

Optimal vitamin D levels may vary for different ethnic, racial groups: Study

   SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend    Print this Page   COMMENT

Washington D.C. | August 14, 2019 3:41:33 PM IST
Doctors should not rely on 'one-size-fits-all' when prescribing vitamin D supplement as each patient has different requirements, suggests a study.

The study was published in the journal 'Metabolism, Clinical and Experimental'.

According to the Institute of Medicine, people with less than 20 nanograms of vitamin D per milliliter of blood are deficient. The Endocrine Society set a higher threshold of 30 nanograms.

"Recommendations based on earlier studies using a number of different tests for vitamin D levels persist and, not surprisingly, current guidelines vary," said author Sylvia Christakos, a professor at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.

"For example, it is not clear that the most optimal levels for vitamin D are the same for Caucasians, blacks or Asians alike. More laboratories are now implementing improved tests and efforts are being made to standardize results from different laboratories," Christakos added.

Vitamin D's main function is to help the body absorb calcium. Deficiency can cause delayed skeletal development and rickets in children and may contribute to osteoporosis and increased risk of fracture in adults.

Vitamin D supplements work best when taken with calcium for rickets and bone loss that occurs with aging. Elderly people who are vitamin D deficient benefit from supplementation as protection against fracture. However, studies did not show supplements to be beneficial as protection against fracture if the elderly person was already sufficient in the vitamin.

The researchers also noted that more vitamin D supplementation is not better. Previous studies have shown that very high doses of vitamin D (300,000-500,00 iu taken over a year) seem to increase fracture risk. (The National Academy of Medicine recommends 400 iu/day for infants, 600 iu/day for people age 1 to 70 and 800 iu/day for people over 70; the Endocrine Society suggests doses up to 2,000 iu/day for adults.)

Although vitamin D supplementation has been shown to reduce overall mortality and some studies suggest that vitamin D might be beneficial for immune function, cancer and cardiovascular health, Christakos said a consistent benefit of vitamin D supplementation has yet to be shown. However, she noted, most studies have not discriminated between participants who are vitamin D sufficient or deficient. (ANI)

 
  LATEST COMMENTS (0)
POST YOUR COMMENT
Comments Not Available
 
POST YOUR COMMENT
 
 
TRENDING TOPICS
 
 
CITY NEWS
MORE CITIES
 
 
 
MORE HEALTH NEWS
R'sthan tops free medicine supply scheme...
Optic nerve stimulation to offer visual ...
IIT-D students launch reusable sanitary ...
Sudanese man with malignant brain tumour...
Simple computational models may help pre...
IIT Delhi startup Sanfe launches reusabl...
More...
 
INDIA WORLD ASIA
First encounter in J&K since abrogation ...
Stalin dubs actions of CBI, ED against C...
Corrupt IL&FS management flouted rules...
Evergreening loans: IFIN lent to stresse...
IL&FS antics: Lending behemoth without '...
Army to set up Human Rights section...
More...    
 
 Top Stories
Apple's digital credit card now ava... 
Financial institutions debit Rs 759... 
Facebook requires 'significant work... 
IL&FS did not disclose NPAs for 4 y... 
Ex-MP CM Babulal Gaur passes away... 
Yamuna water level not rising anymo... 
Truck operators' strike enters thir... 
Rahul, Priyanka come out in Chidamb...