Friday, February 23, 2018
News

This drink may help ward off Alzheimer''s: Scientist

   SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend    Print this Page   COMMENT

New York | Tuesday, 2017 1:45:04 PM IST
 
Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a nutrient mix that has shown potential to slow down cognitive impairment in the early stages of Alzheimer''s disease.

The drink, called Souvenaid is aimed at treating "the root cause" of Alzheimer''s, which is the loss of brain synapses.

Souvenaid contains omega-3 fatty acids found in oily fish like salmon and mackeral along with high doses of Vitamin B13, B, C and E.

The mixture increases production of new synapses and restores connectivity between brain regions, improving memory and other cognitive functions, the researchers reported, in the MIT Technology Review.

In the new clinical trial, published in the journal Lancet Neurology, the team conducted a 24-month trial, where more than 300 patients with prodromal Alzheimer''s -- the predementia stage of Alzheimer''s with mild symptoms -- were randomly assigned Souvenaid or a placebo.

The patients taking Souvenaid showed about 45 per cent less cognitive decline than people taking the placebo.

Patients who drank Souvenaid showed less worsening in everyday cognitive and functional performance and improvement in verbal-memory performance.

"It feels like science-fiction, where you can take a drink of Souvenaid and you get more synapses...for improved cognitive function. But it works," said Richard Wurtman, Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston.

Importantly, Souvenaid led to a 26 per cent reduction in the loss of hippocampal volume, which is caused early in Alzheimer''s by brain tissue loss.

The results indicate that Souvenaid may be able to slow or stop full progression of very early Alzheimer''s into a full-blown disease, Wurtman noted.

The findings could encourage more researchers to view synapse restoration as a treatment for Alzheimer''s.

"Everyone who writes about Alzheimer''s knows there''s a synapse deficiency, and this impairs connections between brain regions. Even if the amyloid or another problem gets solved, one way or another, you''ll have to replace these synapses," Wurtman said.

--IANS rt/in/vm

( 326 Words)

2017-10-31-13:16:08 (IANS)

Watch News Videos

 
  LATEST COMMENTS (0)
POST YOUR COMMENT
Comments Not Available
 
POST YOUR COMMENT
 
TRENDING TOPICS
 
 
 
CITY NEWS
MORE CITIES
 
MORE HEALTH NEWS
Sipping red wine may ward off your gum d...
Infants can learn abstract rules visuall...
Beetroot juice supplements can benefit h...
Testing tears may help in early diagnosi...
Genetics may play big role in kid's snac...
New iPhone app to aid heart attack survi...
More...
 
INDIA WORLD ASIA
Kerala CM condemns murder of Adivasi you...
Delhi CS assault case: Bail plea of AAP ...
NPTEL ties up with Glass industry for bu...
Security tightened for PM's visit to cit...
Kejriwal conducts 'secret dealings' in r...
Sonakshi Sinha to play cameo in Navdeep ...
More...    
 
 Top Stories
'RBI Governor should quit after PNB... 
Sipping red wine may ward off your ... 
OnePlus captures 48% premium market... 
Bank unions defer March 15 strike... 
Delhi college suspends two students... 
Another JMB terrorist nabbed in Ben... 
Himalayan motor rally starts in Sil... 
Kerala CPI-M says its membership ha...